The Faith of a Mustard Seed

It was Thursday of October 25, 2018, when I woke early in the morning to prepare for a very important meeting. I was up the night prior with my team, putting together a strategy for a client we’ve recently picked up.

I was filled with so much anxiety in anticipation for this meeting, that I barely slept. I tossed and turned. Woke up googling material to communicate during the meeting. Doubting myself almost, feeling as if I didn’t prepare as much as I should’ve because of this work with this client.

The meeting was scheduled for 9:30am downtown at the historic Chicago Board of Trade building, and I hailed an Uber from my residence far south of the city. My Uber arrived and I planned to look over more material for this meeting. Then I heard something extremely familiar to me, a song. A gospel song.

I sang along:

Way maker, miracle worker, promise keeper, light in the darkness,

My God, that is who you are.

Now there are many different things going on here. The synchronicity of Uber matching a driver of this same demographic background of me, down to the tee. A Nigerian-born Immigrant who’s faith precedes him. We also shared mutual friends together, though he’s much older than me.

The vibrational aspects of the song, shifting the very atoms of my being and transferring my consciousness from a state of anxiety and worry, to faith and worship.

The fellowship of man in his most natural and vulnerable state, which lead to something powerful, opening up everything.

My Uber driver asked me how I knew this song and I told him about my spirituality and belonging in the church. Coincidentally, or synchronicitly, he was familiar with my place of worship. Then I was filled with a spirit of enthusiasm and excitement and began to minister to him.

Mind you, he’s old enough to be my father, but that didn’t matter because I had a word for him.

He told me about his fight with faith, and how he believed he didn’t have enough faith. He struggled with it and I could tell that it was really bothering him.

I pulled out my phone and read him one of my favorite scriptures.

The apostles said to the Lord, “Increase our faith!” And the Lord said, “If you had faith like a grain of mustard seed, you could say to this mulberry tree, ‘Be uprooted and planted in the sea,’ and it would obey you.

Luke 17:5-6

I reassured the man that even the Apostles in the Bible asked the Lord to increase their faith. If the apostles could ask that, then we should not have any shame in doing so. I wanted to drive this point home because he was feeling so bad and I knew where he was coming from.

Not only did the apostles ask the Lord to increase their faith, but the Lord’s response also assured them that their faith need not be bigger than a mustard seed. As small as a mustard seed is, it’s very firm and compact. It’s not easily broken but again, it’s not the biggest thing in the world.

If we exercise this in our faith and believe that what we say will happen, will happen. If we have a firm understanding that there is a possibility, with our Creator on our side, that these things will happen, without an ounce of doubt. If we have this faith, the removes all fear from our minds, mountains will move.

I strongly believe that this conversation initiated a paradigm shift in which. It took my mind off my own meeting and the anxiousness I was harboring. At the end of the day, those the seek first the kingdom of God will find everything they’re looking for, and peace will rule their lives.

As I’ve said it, and you’ve heard it, so shall it be.

Happy Sunday!

About the Author O.K. Arowolaju

Youth Minister, Product Manager

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